1. fullcravings:

Flourless Chocolate Whiskey Cake with Chocolate Whiskey Pudding Sauce

    fullcravings:

    Flourless Chocolate Whiskey Cake with Chocolate Whiskey Pudding Sauce

  2. literaryjukebox:

    Love is the only way to rescue humanity from all ills.

    Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828–November 20, 1910) in his correspondence with Mahatma Gandhi, A Letter to a Hindu

    Song: “All Is Love” by Karen O and the Kids

  3. literaryjukebox:

    Love is the only way to rescue humanity from all ills.

    Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828–November 20, 1910) in his correspondence with Mahatma Gandhi, A Letter to a Hindu

    Song: “All Is Love” by Karen O and the Kids

  4. averagefairy:

    why do they even include 2014 as an option when selecting your birth year online like u fresh out the womb ready to join gmail

  5. (Source: ohohmeo)

  6. girlwhowasonfire:

deans-avenging-angel:

girlwhowasonfire:

Found a better use for the wine glasses

That’s a martini glass

I’m literally using it for milk and cookies does it look like I care about the finer points of debauchery

    girlwhowasonfire:

    deans-avenging-angel:

    girlwhowasonfire:

    Found a better use for the wine glasses

    That’s a martini glass

    I’m literally using it for milk and cookies does it look like I care about the finer points of debauchery

  7. Here are three elements we often see in town names:

    If a town ends in “-by”, it was originally a farmstead or a small village where some of the Viking invaders settled. The first part of the name sometimes referred to the person who owned the farm - Grimsby was “Grim’s village”. Derby was “a village where deer were found”. The word “by” still means “town” in Danish.

    If a town ends in “-ing”, it tells us about the people who lived there. Reading means “The people of Reada”, in other words “Reada’s family or tribe”. We don’t know who Reada was, but his name means “red one”, so he probably had red hair.

    If a town ends in “-caster” or “-chester”, it was originally a Roman fort or town. The word comes from a Latin words “castra”, meaning a camp or fortification. The first part of the name is usually the name of the locality where the fort was built. So Lancaster, for example, is “the Roman fort on the River Lune”.

    — 

    A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 173. (via linguaphilioist)

    woah!

    (via submariet)

  8. itsababyshambles:

    (x)

  9. What is straight? A line can be straight, or a street, but the human heart, oh, no, it’s curved like a road through mountains.

    — ― Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire

  10. "I don’t know how to be myself. It’s like I’m permanently outside myself. Like, like you can push your hand straight through me if you wanted to. And I couldn’t see the type of man that I wanna be versus the type of man that I actually am and I know that I’m doing it but I’m incapable of doing what needs to be done. I am like Pinocchio. I’m a wooden boy, not a real boy. And that kills me." - The Double (2013)